Computer Graphics and Visualization Lab
Department of Computer Science at Purdue University

Differences

This shows you the differences between the selected revision and the current version of the page.

projects:genuinitytemp 2011/06/08 11:39 projects:genuinitytemp 2011/06/08 11:40 current
Line 42: Line 42:
^**Overview**  ^ ^**Overview**  ^
| Our initial work provided a way to embed fragile signatures into physical objects. The approach provides an algorithm for encoding into a digital 3D object information that enables determining genuinity of a physical object after its automated manufacturing and it being copied by an adversary even if the adversary has copying and manufacturing technology superior to the original manufacturer. In today's technological world, many physical objects are manufactured using 3D computer graphics models and digitally controlled devices (e.g., milling machines, 3D printers, and robotic arms).  The manufactured objects can range from inexpensive steel screws to costly and carefully designed parts, for example, for engines and for medical instruments. Our algorithm provides a way to encode a unique signature into a computer-designed and fabricated object and a way to decode the signature in order to verify object genuinity. The following figure shows the overview process of our design.  | | Our initial work provided a way to embed fragile signatures into physical objects. The approach provides an algorithm for encoding into a digital 3D object information that enables determining genuinity of a physical object after its automated manufacturing and it being copied by an adversary even if the adversary has copying and manufacturing technology superior to the original manufacturer. In today's technological world, many physical objects are manufactured using 3D computer graphics models and digitally controlled devices (e.g., milling machines, 3D printers, and robotic arms).  The manufactured objects can range from inexpensive steel screws to costly and carefully designed parts, for example, for engines and for medical instruments. Our algorithm provides a way to encode a unique signature into a computer-designed and fabricated object and a way to decode the signature in order to verify object genuinity. The following figure shows the overview process of our design.  |
-| {{:wiki:projects:genuinity.jpg|}} \\ (a,d) Computer-generated signature as per user specifications which is embedded into a subset of the object. (b, e) The automatically manufactured physical object. (c, f) An automated verification system determines whether it is genuine or is a copy  |+| {{:wiki:projects:genuinity.jpg|}}
 +| (a,d) Computer-generated signature as per user specifications which is embedded into a subset of the object. (b, e) The automatically manufactured physical object. (c, f) An automated verification system determines whether it is genuine or is a copy  |
^**Signature Design**  ^ ^**Signature Design**  ^
 

projects/genuinitytemp.txt · Last modified: 2011/06/08 11:40 by chao1
  [Main Page]   [Projects]   [Publications]   [People]   [Courses]   [Talks]